To: Pastor Sarah Jakes Roberts

From: A PK, with love..

Dominique Simpson

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I will never miss the opportunity to remind the culture that Black women are still a very under represented demographic. It’s 2022 and we’re still seeing a long list of “first Black woman -”. That reality can be deflating at times especially considering the fact that I haven’t even made mention of all the different sub-genres of black women. Of those sub-genres belongs Christian Black women, and Christian “preacher’s kid” Black women. Unless you are apart of either of these two groups or know someone closely that is, I’m willing to bet these subsets have likely never crossed your mind. Can you see the margins being filled in? I hope I’ve illustrated well how difficult it is to relate to someone of this demographic. Let me explain a little of what its like.

Regardless of gender “pastors or preachers kid(s)” account for an acute percentage of the population. PK’s rarely ever receive societal recognition because it’s not sexy. When I say sexy I mean that the life of a pastor or their kid’s lives for that matter is not culturally attractive to mention — unless of course it involves some type of scandal. Then there’s all of a sudden plenty of discussion following with “this is the problem with the church”. And though pastors and PK’s are no concern of the culture’s until some type of expose of their humanity, I’m sure if you ask any PK of the pressure they experience growing up and some even as adults, they’d describe a pressure that only someone like Bronny James or Blu Ivy can relate to. You may think that seems hyperbolic but be mindful I’m juxtaposing pressure and not the notoriety of their parents. Arguably it’s worse for girl PK’s because, well, we may not have the time to unpack that. We’re all well aware of the differences of the societal margin of error for girls and boys. Selah. Let’s move on.

My generation likes to blame their parents or grandparents for their church hurt or for their apprehension of Christianity. Some of those same people make mention of their praying grandmother, the one they wish they could call to get a prayer through. Or just to hear their voice one last time, knowing they’ll give them an encouraging word that would give them the strength they needed to face another day. I’m grateful to still have a praying grandmother. Tinny, Reverend C.L. Smith’s youngest daughter is still here for me to enjoy and love on. But I had a praying grandfather too. Deacon Charles Simpson from Big Miller Grove Baptist Church — that man was my…

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Dominique Simpson

The hermit scribe, a witty womanist. Essayist, poet, and black literature enthusiast. Unequivocally and unapologetically black.